Christmas Lights Installation Recent History

Christmas Lights Installation is a beautiful tradition that very few people don’t really enjoy, let us tell you a little of its history in the recent years

It was not until after World War II that outdoor Christmas displays finally became popular with the middle class.

The end of the war brought a feeling of optimism and prosperity unknown to most who had lived through both the Depression and the war “The late forties and early fifties were the heyday of outdoor illumination,” says Gene Teslovic, a collector of Christmas lights and manufacturer’s catalogs.

“Mass-production brought down the cost, making lights more affordable for the average homeowner, and magazine advertisements featuring elaborately decorated homes brought the idea to the public’s attention.”
Homemade displays had been a popular addition to the trimmings until the early fifties when ready-made decorations made their appearance. Union Products, one of the oldest manufacturers of lawn ornaments, sold their first two-dimensional outdoor Christmas display of a sleigh and reindeer in 1952. Two years later they began selling three-dimensional foam-plastic outdoor figures. “They were very spongy and a favorite toy of dogs, who loved to eat them,” said Don Featherstone, vice-president of the company.

By 1956 styrene was found to be a plastic that could withstand the heat of a bulb, so the company began to use the material to mass-produce, through injection molding plastic lighted figurines similar to those sold today. “At about the same time, aluminum Christmas trees became popular Together with plastic figurines they created a more carefree attitude about house decorations that required less effort,” said Gene Teslovic.
The energy crisis of 1973 brought an abrupt halt to the decorating craze, as Americans complied with President Nixon’s request to refrain from Christmas Lights Installation. “We were a multi-million dollar business, whose sales dropped to $100,000 that year,” Don Featherstone stated. “It took five or six years before people started buying decorations again as they had.”